Info

FIGURE 53-4 Effect of iron status on the absorption of nonheme iron in food. The percentages of iron absorbed from diets of low, medium, and high bioavailability in individuals with iron stores of 0, 250, 500, and 1000 mg are portrayed.

Availability of nonheme iron

FIGURE 53-4 Effect of iron status on the absorption of nonheme iron in food. The percentages of iron absorbed from diets of low, medium, and high bioavailability in individuals with iron stores of 0, 250, 500, and 1000 mg are portrayed.

acid; other effects also may be involved. Thus, assessment of available dietary iron should include both the amount of iron ingested and an estimate of its availability (Figure 53-4).

iron deficiency Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder, and leads to progressive changes in erythropoiesis that are outlined in Figure 53-5. The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in the U.S. is 1-4%, depending on the economic status of the population. In developing countries, up to 20-40% of infants and pregnant women may be affected. Better iron balance has resulted from the practice of fortifying flour, the use of iron-fortified formulas for infants, and the prescription of medicinal iron supplements during pregnancy.

Iron-deficiency anemia results from dietary intake of iron that is inadequate to meet normal requirements (nutritional iron deficiency), blood loss, or interference with iron absorption. Most nutritional iron deficiency in the U.S. is mild. More severe iron deficiency is usually the result of blood loss, either from the GI tract, or in women, from the uterus. Impaired absorption of iron from food results most often from partial gastrectomy or malabsorption in the small intestine. Finally, erythropoietin therapy can result in a functional iron deficiency.

Iron-Deficient Iron-Deficiency Normal Iron Depletion Erythropoiesis Anemia

Erythron Iron -

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment