F

FIGURE 8.3 Types of nonglandular and glandular trichomes. (a) Uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with several short basal cells and elongated terminal cells (frequently found in members of the Asteraceae) of Achillea millefolium leaf (surface view); (b) uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with several short basal cells and elongated terminal cells (frequently found in members of the Asteraceae) of Achillea millefolium leaf (surface view); (c) uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with warted cuticles of Digitalis purpurea leaf (surface view); (d) uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with warted cuticles of Digitalis purpurea leaf (surface view). (Images courtesy of Prof. Dr. Reinhard Länger, AGES PharmMed, Vienna, Austria.)

FIGURE 8.3 Types of nonglandular and glandular trichomes. (a) Uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with several short basal cells and elongated terminal cells (frequently found in members of the Asteraceae) of Achillea millefolium leaf (surface view); (b) uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with several short basal cells and elongated terminal cells (frequently found in members of the Asteraceae) of Achillea millefolium leaf (surface view); (c) uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with warted cuticles of Digitalis purpurea leaf (surface view); (d) uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with warted cuticles of Digitalis purpurea leaf (surface view). (Images courtesy of Prof. Dr. Reinhard Länger, AGES PharmMed, Vienna, Austria.)

allow the cells to stretch as the plant grows. Because they are found in all plants, this is not useful for the identification of plant species. The presence or absence of tracheary elements with bordered pits can be useful in the identification of plant species. As noted before, the shape of the pit can help distinguish gymnosperms from angiosperms. However, it may be difficult to differentiate tracheids from fibers. Tracheids typically have bordered pits, whereas fibers are generally free of pits or have oblique, slit-shaped simple pits (Figure 8.6c and d).

FIGURE 8.3 (continued.) Types of nonglandular and glandular trichomes. (e) Unicellular nonglandular trichome with warted cuticle of Senna alexandrina leaf (transverse section); (f) papillae on a corolla of Arnica montana floret; (g) emergence stinging trichome of Urtica dioica leaf (surface view); (h) transverse section (top) and surface view (bottom) of biseriate glandular trichome of Achillea millefolium (Asteraceae type) leaf. (Images courtesy of Prof. Dr. Reinhard Länger, AGES PharmMed, Vienna, Austria.)

FIGURE 8.3 (continued.) Types of nonglandular and glandular trichomes. (e) Unicellular nonglandular trichome with warted cuticle of Senna alexandrina leaf (transverse section); (f) papillae on a corolla of Arnica montana floret; (g) emergence stinging trichome of Urtica dioica leaf (surface view); (h) transverse section (top) and surface view (bottom) of biseriate glandular trichome of Achillea millefolium (Asteraceae type) leaf. (Images courtesy of Prof. Dr. Reinhard Länger, AGES PharmMed, Vienna, Austria.)

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