Recommendations

Data from the NHANES III, 1988-1994 found the highest mean intakes of vitamin C from both diet and supplements for all gender and life stage

Table 5.2

Common Vitamin C Food Sources

Table 5.2

Common Vitamin C Food Sources

Food Source

Serving Size

Vitamin C (mg)

Broccoli, cooked

1/2 cup

58

BrĂ¼ssel sprouts, cooked

1/2 cup

48

Cabbage, cooked

1/2 cup

15

Cauliflower, cooked

1/2 cup

27

Grapefruit

1/2 medium

fresh

44

juice

6 ounces

60

Orange

fresh

1 medium

70

juice

6 ounces

75

Pepper, sweet, red, raw

1/2 cup

141

Potato

baked

1 medium

26

sweet, baked

1 medium

22

Spinach

frozen, cooked

1/2 cup

2

raw

1/2 cup

4

Strawberries, fresh, whole

1 cup

82

Tomato

fresh

1 medium

23

juice

1 cup

45

sauce

1 cup

32

Source: Adapted from Higdon, "Vitamin C," The Linus Pauling Institute, 2006.

Source: Adapted from Higdon, "Vitamin C," The Linus Pauling Institute, 2006.

groups was about 200 mg/d, with 1,200mg/d the highest reported intake.12 The Food and Nutrition Board concluded that Americans are unlikely to exceed the UL for vitamin C from both food and supplements. They also determined that supplementing the American diet with vitamin C does not appear to result in added health benefits. Therefore the Food and Nutrition Board recommends intake of vitamin C should come from at least five servings of fruits and vegetables daily. Those population groups at risk for vitamin C deficiency (poor fruit and vegetable intakes or those with oxidative stresses [smokers, nonsmokers, alcohol and drug abusers]) may benefit from added vitamin C dietary supplements under medical supervision. Those using anticoagulant medications should avoid dietary supplements, unless otherwise directed by their physician. DRI recommendations for vitamin C are provided in Appendix B.

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