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Page 241 Table 7.2

Pharmaceutical antipsychotic drugs

Page 241 Table 7.2

Pharmaceutical antipsychotic drugs

Class

Generic name

Trade name

Phenothiazines

Chlorpromazine

Thorazine

Thioridazine

Mellaril

Mesoridazine

Serentil

Trifluoperazine

Stelazine

Fluphenazine

Prolixin

Prochlorperazine

Compazine

Thioxanthenes

Chlorprohixine

Taractan

Thiothixene

Navane

Butyrophenone

Haloperidol

Haldol

Dibenzoxapine

Loxapine

Loxitane

Dihydroindolone

Molindone

Moban

New generation

Clozapine

Clozaril

Risperidone

Risperidal

Olanzepine

Zyprexa

Sertindole

Serlect

Pharmaceutical Antipsychotics

Despite the existence of several available antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medications, they are uniformly potent antagonists of dopamine receptors (table 7.2). The potency of the medications' antagonism at D2 receptors correlates linearly with their antipsychotic efficacy. These facts, combined with knowledge that dopamine-activating drugs (cocaine, amphetamines) can create a paranoia-like and a schizophrenia-like psychosis have led to the dopamine-hypothesis of schizophrenia. Although consistent, this does not explain all aspects of schizophrenia, like negative symptoms of cognitive and affective deficits. Other theories have proposed neurodevelopmental underpinnings of schizophrenia and amino acid neurotransmitter bases (Akbarian et al. 1996; Weinberger 1996). Whereas prefrontal abnormalities have been associated with negative symptoms, temporolimbic abnormalities are associated with positive symptoms. (Casanova 1997; Bogerts 1997; Mattson et al. 1997). These theories are not mutually exclusive. To summarize, it seems that

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