List of Authors

The Autoimmune Bible System

Natural Treatment for Autoimmune Diseases Found

Get Instant Access

Gustavo Barja obtained his PhD in biological sciences from the Complutense University of Madrid in 1981. He continued his scientific research, performing short stays at the Universities of Paris VII (France), UCLA (USA), Brescia (Italy) and ETH (Switzerland). He has dedicated his research activities to the study of free radicals and oxidative stress in animals, focusing on aging and longevity. He is currently full professor of physiology at Complutense University, where he teaches comparative animal physiology to biology students, as well as PhD courses on comparative biochemistry and aging. He has published three books and over 150 peer-reviewed papers, has participated in 17 multiyear national or international research projects, and has received five prizes for his research into aging, including the Pfizer Foundation Award in 2000. In 2001 he was nominated as a member of the Royal Academy of Pharmacy of Spain.

Gustavo Barja, Complutense University, Faculty of Biology, Department of Animal Physiology-II, Madrid 28040, Spain

Torsten Burkholz studied chemistry at the University of Saarland, Saarbruecken, Germany. He obtained his first degree in chemistry in June 2006. In October 2006, he joined the Division of Bioorganic Chemistry and is currently conducting research as part of his PhD thesis entitled ''Oxidative stress and electrochemical procedures for surface decontamination in dialysis''. This project is supported by Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany.

Torsten Burkholz, Universität des Saarlandes, School of Pharmacy, Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, 66041 Saarbrücken, Germany

Adam J. Case is a fifth-year combined MD/PhD student at the University of Iowa. He is currently pursing a PhD in free radical and radiation biology, and his research interests include elucidation of the role of antioxidant enzymes in cancer, epi-genetics of regulatory enzymes, and the use of antidiabetes medication in the prevention of oncogenesis. Following his thesis dissertation, Adam plans to pursue a medical residency in pediatrics where he hopes to practice both clinical and research medicine in the field of pediatric oncology.

Adam J. Case, The University of Iowa, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Carver College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Iowa City, IA 52242-1181, USA

Edith Charlier is a PhD student at the GIGA-Research Center, Liège, Belgium, in the division of Jacques Piette in the subgroup of Geoffrey Gloire. She studied biochemistry at the University of Liège and she joined the division of Jacques Piette for her thesis. She is working on an inositol phosphatase which influences the sensitivity of T lymphocytes to CD95-induced cell death.

Edith Charlier, University of Liège, Virology-Immunology Unit, GIGA-Research, 1, avenue de l'Hopital, 4000 Liège, Belgium

Silvia Cristofanon received her PhD from the University of Rome Tor Vergata in spring 2008 after three years of research at the LBMCC Lab in Luxembourg. Her major interests are related to apototic cell signaling pathways in human leukemia cells induced by glutathione depletion.

Silvia Cristofanon, Hôpital Kirchberg, Fondation Recherche sur le Cancer et les Maladies du Sang, Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du Cancer (LBMCC), 9, rue Edward Steichen, 2540 Luxembourg and Universita' di Roma ''Tor Vergata'', Dipartimento di Biologia, via Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma, Italy

Alison Curnow As medical research director of Cornwall Dermatology Research (Peninsula Medical School, UK), Alison Curnow has established one of the top dermatological photo-dynamic therapy groups in the UK. The clinical and experimental research program aims to improve the effectiveness and diversify the application of this noninvasive light-mediated treatment modality. In addition, the laboratory also investigates the causation and potential prevention of skin carcinogenesis.

She is currently active in undergraduate teaching and postgraduate supervision, as well as being a director of the International Photodynamic Association Board, and has numerous peer-reviewed publications in international scientific and clinical journals to her name.

Alison Curnow, Cornwall Dermatology Research, Peninsula Medical School, The Knowledge Spa, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3HD, UK

Jeroen den Hertog received his PhD at Utrecht University in 1992, based on a thesis that he prepared at the Hubrecht Laboratory, Netherlands Institute for Developmental Biology. He carried out his postdoc under Tony Hunter at the Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA, from 1992 to 1994. In 1994 he became project leader at the Hubrecht Laboratory and in 1997 group leader, while also being appointed professor of molecular developmental zoology at the University of Leiden in 2008. Dr den Hertog has over 70 scientific publications to his name and is the recipient of several grants from the Dutch Cancer Society, Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, Netherlands Proteomics Centre and the European Commission. His research interest is the role of tyrosine phosphoryla-tion and dephosphorylation in development and disease.

Jeroen den Hertog, Hubrecht Institute, Uppsalalaan 8, 3584 CT Utrecht, The Netherlands

Mario Dicato is head of Internal Medicine and of the Service of Haematology-Oncology at Luxembourg Medical Centre. Much of his postgraduate training was spent at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA and at Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Mario Dicato, Hôpital Kirchberg, Fondation Recherche sur le Cancer et les Maladies du Sang, Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du Cancer (LBMCC), 9, rue Edward Steichen, 2540 Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Paolo Di Simplicio is professor of pharmacology at the University of Siena. His research interest is focused on the functional antioxidant aspects of glutathione and other thiols with special emphasis on the regulation of the redox state of biological systems.

Paolo Di Simplicio, University of Siena, Department of Neuroscience, Pharmacology Unit, 53100 Siena, Italy

Marc Diederich received his PhD in molecular pharmacology in 1994 at the University of Nancy (France). He is currently leading the Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du Cancer (LBMCC) in Luxembourg. Research in this laboratory is mainly focused on the inhibition of glutathione-based drug resistance mechanism by natural compounds as well as erythroid differentiation mechanisms.

Marc Diederich, Hôpital Kirchberg, Fondation Recherche sur le Cancer et les Maladies du Sang, Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire du Cancer (LBMCC), 9, rue Edward Steichen, 2540 Luxembourg, Luxembourg

Mandy Doering studied chemistry at the University of Saarland, where she received her first degree in 2007. She joined Claus Jacob's group in bioorganic chemistry as part of her undergraduate project and started to work on multifunctional, biologically active redox catalysts. After graduation, Mandy continues to work on the design of multifunctional redox catalysts with regard to potential applications in medicine and agriculture in Claus Jacob's research group.

Mandy Doering, Universität des Saarlandes, School of Pharmacy, Division of Bioorganic Chemistry, 66041 Saarbrücken, Germany

Yuktee Dogra obtained a BSc (Hons) in microbial and cellular biology and a MRes in aquatic ecotoxicology from the University of Plymouth. She is currently in her third year of studying for a PhD in clinical and biomedical science at the Peninsula Medical School. Her project considers the mechanisms and enhancement of photodynamic therapy in the area of dermatology and employs a variety of biological and chemical methodologies. She has two published papers to date on the effects of tritium on the aquatic environment and represents the School's postgraduate students on the research degree committee.

Yuktee Dogra, Cornwall Dermatology Research, Peninsula Medical School, The Knowledge Spa, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3HD, UK

Frederick E. Domann is a professor of radiation oncology in the Free Radical & Radiation Biology Program at The University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, USA. He earned his PhD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in human cancer biology and subsequently carried out postdoctoral research at The Arizona Cancer Center. He joined the faculty at The University of Iowa in 1993 and has since become an internationally recognized expert in free radical biology and cancer. His research interests include transcriptional regulation and epigenetic control of gene expression in human cancer.

Frederick E. Domann, The University of Iowa, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Carver College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Iowa City, IA 52242-1181, USA

Philip Eaton gained a BSc in biochemistry from Queen Mary College (University of London) in 1989 before completing his PhD studies at the University of Sussex. After postdoctoral work at the Institute of Psychiatry, he joined the Department of Cardiovascular Research, at the Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital in 1995. He remains at the Rayne Institute and is currently based in the Department of Cardiology. A major focus of his work is the covalent modification of cardiac proteins by oxidants, with a particular emphasis on thiol-targeted events such as S-thiolation, interprotein disulfide formation, nitrosylation, sulfenation and sulfination.

Philip Eaton, King's College London, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Cardiology, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, UK

Paul Eggleton runs the inflammation and autoimmunity group at Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, Devon, UK. His interest in the biochemistry of inflammatory pathways developed while studying for his PhD at the Royal College of Surgeons of England in London. His interests in leukocyte biology continued at Boston University Medical School, where he demonstrated that oxidative stress proteins bind to complement proteins and influence innate immunity. His interest in oxidative stress and immunity developed further at Oxford University, where his group focused on the role of complement protein interaction with the oxidative stress protein—calreticulin, and demonstrated that release of

this protein during cell stress modulated autoimmunity and apoptosis. This work is ongoing at Peninsula Medical School.

Paul Eggleton, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Peninsula Medical School, St. Luke's Campus, Magdalen Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK

Pietro Ghezzi, PhD, heads the Laboratory of Neuroimmunol-ogy at the Mario Negri Institute in Milano. His main research interests are on the role of inflammatory cytokines in diseases of the central nervous system and the redox regulation of immunity with a particular focus on glutathiolation and redox proteomics.

Pietro Ghezzi, Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Trafford Centre, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RY, UK

Lina Ghibelli gained her laurea cum laude in biology in 1979, folowed by postdoctoral training at the University of Chicago and EMBL in Heidelberg. Since 1991 she has been leading a research group studying the molecular mechanisms regulating the process of cell death by apoptosis.

Lina Ghibelli, Universita' di Roma ''Tor Vergata'', Diparti-mentodi Biologia, via Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma, Italy

Gregory I. Giles received his PhD from the University of Southampton (UK) and gained postdoctoral experience as a research fellow at the University of Exeter (UK). He was awarded a Frederick Gardner Cottrell Career Enhancement Award to study at the Center for Free Radical Biology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (USA), followed by his first faculty position as a university research fellow at the University of Sydney (Australia). He was appointed to a lectureship at the University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand) in 2008. His research interests include drug design, free radical biology and signal transduction mechanisms.

Gregory I. Giles, Department of Pharmacology, Otago School of Medical Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Geoffrey Gloire is a postdoctoral researcher from the FNRS (Belgian Fund for Scientific Research) at the GIGA-Research Center, Liège, Belgium, in the laboratory of Jacques Piette. He studied biology at the University of Liège and joined the laboratory of Jacques Piette to complete his PhD on the mechanism of NF-kB activation by reactive oxygen species. He now works with his group on the regulation of apoptosis by protein phosphatases and reactive oxygen species in immune cells.

Geoffrey Gloire, University of Liège, Virology-Immunology Unit, GIGA-Research, 1, avenue de l'Hopital, 4000 Liège, Belgium

Nicholas J. Gutowski is a consultant neurologist at the Royal Devon and Exeter Foundation Hospital and senior lecturer in the Peninsula Medical School. He has long-standing research interests with publications in several aspects of neuroscience in neurological diseases, including oxidative stress systems, astrocyte and endothelial cell phenotype changes and neuro-oncology as well as interests in neurodevelopment, in particular the congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

Janet E. Holley completed a BSc in health science at Exeter University in 1998 and an MSc in advanced neuro- and molecular pharmacology at Bristol University in 1999, where she was involved in a research project investigating the antioxidant status of ventilated premature babies. She has been a member ofthe research team at the Peninsula Medical School in Exeter since its foundation and has recently completed her PhD. Her primary interests are in the biology and functions of astrocytes and their role in neuropathology, the interactions between astrocytes and endothelial cells, oxida-tive stress and antioxidant systems in neurological disease, and congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

Thomas R. Hurd, Medical Research Council DunnHuman Nutrition Unit, Wellcome Trust/Medical Research Council Building, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0XY, UK

Lars-Oliver Klotz has been an associate professor at the Environmental Health Research Institute at Heinrich-Heine-University in Düsseldorf, Germany, since 2007. He studied biochemistry at the University of Tübingen, and received his PhD in biochemistry from the University of Düsseldorf in 1998. Following postdoctoral studies at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore, MD, USA, he returned to Düsseldorf in 2000, where he received his lecturing qualification in 2001. Dr. Klotz is a recipient of the Catherine-Pasquier-Award of the European Society of Free Radical Research. His research interests include the biochemistry of oxidative stress, stress-induced signal transduction and molecular processes in aging.

Lars-Oliver Klotz, Department of Molecular Aging Research at Institut für umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF), 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany

David M. Krzywanski received his PhD in environmental health science in 2006 from the University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA. His research centers on free radical biology and human health and disease, with his interests ranging from the enzymatic regulation of glutathione synthesis to the effect of environmental nitrogen dioxide on acute epithelial cell injury. Currently, Dr Krzywanski is a postdoctoral fellow in the UAB Department of Pathology, working under Dr S. Ballinger on projects aimed at understanding the role of mitochondrial signaling in the development ofcardiovascular disease.

David M. Krzywanski, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Center for Free Radical Biology, Birmingham, AL, USA

Christiaan Leeuwenburgh received his PhD from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champagne in 1995. He completed his postdoc in internal medicine at the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology and Division of Atherosclerosis, Nutrition and Lipid Research at Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis. He became an assistant professor at the University of Florida in 1998, where he is currently a professor within the Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine and Institute on Aging, as well as heading the Division of Biology of Aging. Dr Leeuwenburgh's major research focus is on understanding the molecular mechanism of oxidative stress and apoptosis with age in rodent models.

Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, University of Florida, College of Medicine, Division of Biology of Aging, Department of Aging and Geriatrics, Institute on Aging, Biochemistry of Aging Laboratory, Gainesville, FL 32610-0107, USA

Kirsty Line graduated in biochemistry from the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, in 2000. She was awarded her PhD in 2004 in the group of Professor Jenny Littlechild, University of Exeter, investigating novel gamma-lactamase enzymes important in industrial biotransformation reactions, in conjunction with Chirotech Technology Ltd, Cambridge. She has continued to work with Professor Littlechild, carrying out studies on human antioxidant enzymes peroxiredoxin and sulfiredoxin.

Kirsty Line, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Peninsula Medical School, St Luke's Campus, Magdalen Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK

Jennifer A. Littlechild carried out her PhD in biophysics at Kings College, London University, UK, followed by a postdoc fellowship at the Biochemistry Department of Princeton University, USA. In 1975 she became a group leader at the MaxPlanck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin, Germany, returning to the UK in 1980 to Bristol University. She is currently professor of biological chemistry and director of the Exeter Biocatalysis Centre, School of Biosciences. She has over 110 refereed publications to her name and has presented her research work internationally. Her current research involves the structural and mechanistic characterization of human enzymes involved in oxidative stress, aggregation of b-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease, GSTs and response to anticancer drugs and mutations in key enzymes resulting in diabetes and fructose intolerance.

Jennifer A. Littlechild's, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, PeninsulaMedical School, St. Luke's Campus, Magdalen Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK

Philip K. Moore received his BSc and PhD from the University of London. In recent years he was head of the Department of Pharmacology at the National University of Singapore and is now professor of integrative pharmacology at King's College in London. He has been researching biologically active gases for the last 30 years and in that time has reported the characterization of several inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase and latterly hydrogen sulfide donor drugs. His major research interests are in the local regulation of blood flow and permeability, inflammatory mechanisms in arthritis and shock and in the regulation of local mediator biosynthesis and activity.

Philip K. Moore, King's College London, Pharmaceutical Science Division, Franklin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, UK

Michael P. Murphy received his BA in chemistry from Trinity College, Dublin in 1984 and his PhD in biochemistry from Cambridge University in 1987. After spells in the USA, Zimbabwe and Ireland, he took up a position in the Biochemistry Department for the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand in 1992. In 2001 he moved to the MRC Dunn Human Nutrition in Cambridge, UK, where he is a group leader. Currently his special interests are in targeting small molecules such as antioxidants to mitochondria, and in understanding how modifications to the thiol status of mitochondrial proteins contributes to oxidative damage and redox signaling.

Michael P. Murphy, Medical Research Council Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Wellcome Trust/Medical Research Council Building, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0XY, UK

Following a BSc in human nutrition and dietitics at the University of Dublin, Valerie O'Donnell gained her PhD in biochemistry from the University of Bristol, in the field of neutrophil NADPH oxidase. This led to two postdoc positions, first at the University of Bern, Switzerland, and then the University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA. In Switzerland, she worked on mechanisms of TNF cytotoxicity and free radical generation in fibroblasts. At UAB, she worked with Bruce Freeman on interactions of nitric oxide with oxidizing lipids. Following this, she returned to the UK on a Wellcome Trust RCD Fellowship at Cardiff University. She is currently a group leader, working in the area of free radical and lipid biochemistry, related to vascular inflammation.

Valerie B. O'Donnell, Cardiff University, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Immunology, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK

Reinald Pamplona is professor of physiology at the Medical School of the University of Lleida, Spain. He received his MD in 1987 from the University of Barcelona and continued his research under Professor Gustavo Barja, at the Complutense University of Madrid (Spain), and Professor John W. Baynes, at the University of South Carolina (USA), concerning the detection and measurement of mitochondrial free radical production, antioxidant activities, and oxidative-derived molecular damage. Following this, he received his PhD in 1993 from the University of Barcelona, and has since followed the role of oxidative stress in aging and life span and age-related diseases. Currently, he is the head of the Department of Experimental Medicine and director of the Metabolic Physio-pathology Research Group at the Biomedical Research Institute of Lleida (Spain).

Reinald Pamplona, University of Lleida-IRBLLEIDA, Faculty of Medicine, Departament of Experimental Medicine, Lleida 25008, Spain

Dr Rakesh P. Patel gained his PhD from the University of Essex, UK, in 1996 under Professor M.T. Wilson. In 1997 he joined Dr Victor Darley-Usmar's laboratory as a postdoc scientist in the Department of Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he is currently associate professor in the Department of Pathology and co-director of the Department of Pathology Graduate Program. Dr Patel is involved in numerous research projects focused on mechanisms by which inflammation causes injury and on developing novel therapeutic modalities.

Rakesh P. Patel, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, 901 19th Street South, BMR-2, Room 302, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

Jacques Piette is director of the GIGA-Research Center and professor at the University of Liège, where he studied biology and obtained his PhD in 1979. After this, he moved to the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked with John Hearst on psoralen photochemistry. Returning to the University of Liège, he started a research group which is now working on the mechanism of NF-kB activation, Tcell homeostasis and virus immune escape. Prof Piette has published over 200 papers in the fields of biochemistry, immunology and virology, and is a member of the councils of several granting agencies in Belgium.

Jacques Piette, University of Liège, Virology-Immunology Unit, GIGA-Research, 1, avenue de l'Hopital, 4000 Liège, Belgium

Edward M. Postlethwait

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Center for Free Radical Biology, Birmingham, AL, USA

Andrew Pye graduated in biomedical sciences from the University of Wales Institute, Cardiff, UK. He then trained as a biomedical scientist with the Public Health Laboratory Service before enrolling on a PhD program at the Peninsula Medical School, UK. His project investigated the enhancement of photodynamic therapy by the combination of iron chelators with aminolevulinic acid or methyl-aminolevuli-nic acid for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer. Dr Pye is an associate member of the European Society for Photobiology, the American Society for Photobiology and the International Photodynamic Association. He is currently a lecturer at the Peninsula Medical School where he is part of a team developing a new undergraduate degree in clinical sciences.

Andrew Pye, Cornwall Dermatology Research, Peninsula Medical School, The Knowledge Spa, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3HD, UK

Dr Alberto Sanz received his PhD in biology from Complutense University of Madrid in 2006, for his studies of the relation between free radical production and dietary restriction. Under Professor Barja's supervision, he was the first to describe the control of free radical production by methionine content in diet. He has worked as researcher in four different countries, and has been awarded various honors, such as a PhD fellowship from the Madame Curie Program, an EMBO long-term postdoctoral fellowship and a postdoctoral grant from the Finnish Academy. Dr Sanz now works in the Mitochondrial Gene Expression and Disease Group at the Institute of Medical Technology, Finland where he is currently testing the mitochondrial free radical theory of aging in Drosophila melanogaster.

Alberto Sanz, Tampere University, Institute of Medical Technology, Mitochondrial Gene Expression and Disease Group, Tampere, 33014, Finland

Ewald Schröder gained his BSc in biomolecular science from the University of Portsmouth, UK, before completing his doctorate in the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, University of Oxford, on the structure and function of cysteine proteases. It was here that his chance discovery of peroxir-edoxin as a novel substrate for the protease calpain stimulated his interest in studying redox proteins. Further postdoctoral work at the Universities of Exeter (UK), Wake Forest (USA) and Kings College, London (UK) have led to a range of publications that address various structural and functional aspects of peroxiredoxin and other redox active proteins, including the crystallographic determination ofthe first deca-meric peroxiredoxin structure.

Ewald Schröder, King's College London, Cardiovascular Division, Department of Cardiology, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH, UK

Helmut Sies is emeritus professor at the Heinrich-Heine University in Düsseldorf, Germany. He received his MD from the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, in 1967, where he gained his lecturing qualification in physiological chemistry and physical biochemistry in 1972. Until 2008 he was chairman of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I at the Faculty of Medicine, and was president of the International Society for Free Radical Research from 1998 until 2000. He has also been president of the Northrhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences. Prof Sies

received an honorary PhD from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1996. His research interests include oxidative stress: oxidants and antioxidants as well as micro-nutrients and vitamins.

Helmut Sies,Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Institut für Biochemie und Molekularbiologie I, Universitässtr. 1, Geb. 22.03, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany

Katalin É. Szabó graduated from the Eötvös Loránd University of Budapest, Hungary in 2000 with an MSc in microbiology and molecular biology. After completing a PhD in environmental sciences and carrying out her postdoc in Hungary and Sweden, investigating the dynamics of freshwater microbial communities with molecular and microscopical methods, she switched her research to biomedical sciences. She is now studying for a PhD at the Peninsula Medical School, researching the role of peroxiredoxins in rheumatoid arthritis. Her research interests are autoimmune, inflammatory and allergic diseases, and the role of oxidative stress and environmental factors in their development.

Katalin É. Szabó, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth, Peninsula Medical School, St Luke's Campus, Magdalen Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK

Jessica Tyrrell graduated in biochemistry from the University of Oxford, UK, in 2007. She then enrolled in a PhD program at the Peninsula Medical School, UK, commencing in September 2007. This investigates the enhancement of clinical dermatological photodynamic therapy for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers and uses noninvasive techniques to enhance our understanding of the treatment process in situ.

Jessica Tyrrell, Cornwall Dermatology Research, Peninsula Medical School, The Knowledge Spa, Truro, Cornwall TR1 3HD, UK.

Masuko Ushio-Fukai received her PhD from the Division of Molecular Cardiology, Kyushu University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan in 1995. She then went on a postdoctoral fellowship in the Division of Cardiology at Emory University, where she was promoted to assistant professor ofmedicine in 1999. In 2006 she moved to the Department of Pharmacology and Center for Lung and Vascular Biology at the University of Illinois, Chicago, as an associate professor. Dr Ushio-Fukai is currently on two editorial boards and has published in many journals, as well as serving on peer-review committees.

Dr Ushio-Fukai's research focuses on vascular biology and growth-related signaling.

Masuko Ushio-Fukai, University of Illinois at Chicago, Center for Lung and Vascular Biology, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Department of Pharmacology, 835 S. Wolcott, M/C868, Chicago, IL 60605, USA

Dario Vitturi earned his degree in biochemistry from the Universidad de la Republica (Montevideo, Uruguay) after spending four years working under the direction of Drs Gerardo Ferrer-Sueta and Ana Denicola in the Labratorio de Fisicoquimica Biologica. Following his graduation in 2005, he moved to the University of Alabama at Birmingham to pursue a doctorate in pathology. In 2006 he joined Dr Rakesh Patel's laboratory where he is currently carrying out his graduate studies.

Dario Vitturi, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, 901 19th Street South, BMR-2, Room 302, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA

Matthew Whiteman received his PhD in 1998 from King's College University of London. Following his postdoc research, he moved in 2000 to the Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, as an assistant professor. In 2005 he was appointed associate professor of medical biochemistry and assistant dean of research. In 2007 he returned to England, where he is now a principal investigator at the Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, Peninsula Medical School, Exeter. He has been researching reactive species for 14 years and since 2002 has been working on the physiology and biochemistry of hydrogen sulfide and its interaction at the chemical and cellular level with nitric oxide and other physiological gases mediators. Dr. White-man's major research interests are the pathology of human arthropathies and other chronic inflammatory conditions, and investigating their resolution by novel mechanisms.

Matthew Whiteman, PeninsulaMedical School, Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, St. Luke's Campus, Magdalen Road, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK

Was this article helpful?

0 0
How To Prevent Skin Cancer

How To Prevent Skin Cancer

Complete Guide to Preventing Skin Cancer. We all know enough to fear the name, just as we do the words tumor and malignant. But apart from that, most of us know very little at all about cancer, especially skin cancer in itself. If I were to ask you to tell me about skin cancer right now, what would you say? Apart from the fact that its a cancer on the skin, that is.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment